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* 26-page lesson
    (40 exercises)

 

* 2-page MINI
    lesson    (PDF)

* MP3 (UK male)

* MP3 (USA female)

* MP3 (20 questions)

* Listen & spell

* Dictation -
    (10 sentences)

* Speed Reading
    (200 - 500 wpm)

* Text jumble 15

* Text jumble 24

* No spaces

* Sentence jumble

* QUIZ 

* Grammar gap-fill

* Articles gap-fill

* Prepositions

* Word order

* Consonants

* Vowels

* Missing letters

* Initials only

* No letters

* Fill-in-the-blank

* Hangman

* Flash cards

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* Matching

* Crossword

* Missing words

* Gap-fill

Survey reveals management pet hates (6th May, 2013)

A survey of over 2,000 British managers has revealed which habits irritate them most while at work. One of the most annoying things for today's managers is the current crop of jargon, or "management speak". Others high on the list include people who sit opposite you sending you emails, when they could simply tell you their message; people arriving late for work and for meetings; and people who take regular cigarette breaks. Report author Charles Elvin explained why it is important for us to know what annoys people. He said: "When office-based teams work in close proximity for long periods of time, we see that seemingly trivial issues can grow disproportionately. If left unchecked, they can begin to cause upset and resentment."


 

Management jargon proved to be an emotive issue for those participating in the research. Many managers described it as a "pointless irritation" which few people understand. They wondered why people used it when there are "normal" ways to express the same thing. Cited examples included 'thinking outside the box', 'going forward' and 'let's touch base'. The "real-world equivalents" of these are 'looking at things differently', 'in the future' and 'contact me'. The Plain English Campaign stated overused jargon damages the economy. The group said: "Management speak…gets in the way of business….It isolates newcomers who feel they have to learn the lingo….It acts as a barrier to procuring new business."

Sources:
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/05/01/management_speak-jargon-office-boss-_n_3192689.html?utm_hp_ref=uk
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/jobs/10030834/Office-workers-irritated-by-management-speak.html
http://www.itv.com/news/2013-05-02/outside-the-box-jargon-is-the-bane-of-office-workers/


 
 

WARM-UPS


 

1. JARGON: Students walk around the class and talk to other students about jargon and management speak. Change partners often and share your findings.

2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, decide which of these topics or words from the article are most interesting and which are most boring.

 

survey / managers / jargon / annoying / late for work / cigarette breaks / trivial issues / pointless / going forward / let's touch base / in the future / newcomers / barrier

Have a chat about the topics you liked. Change topics and partners frequently.

3. PET HATES: What are yours? Complete this table and share what you wrote with your partner(s).

Hate about…

Pet hate

Why?

shopping

 

 

working

 

 

English

 

 

family

 

 

traveling

 

 

computers

 

 

4. PLAIN ENGLISH: Students A strongly believe we are inventing too much unnecessary words and we should stick to plain language; Students B strongly believe more words are better.  Change partners again and talk about your conversations.

5. ANNOYANCES: Rank these and share your rankings with your partner. Put the most annoying at the top. Change partners often and share your rankings.

  • people smoking
  • people not saying 'thank you'
  • people being late
  • computer screen freezing
  • slow drivers
  • TV commercials
  • untidiness
  • forgetting English words

6. MANAGEMENT Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the word 'management'. Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories.


 
 

BEFORE READING / LISTENING

1. TRUE / FALSE: Read the headline. Guess if  a-h  below are true (T) or false (F).

a.

New research shows that successful managers do not own a pet.

T / F

b.

People get annoyed at receiving e-mail from a worker sitting nearby.

T / F

c.

A researcher suggested we need to know what annoys different people.

T / F

d.

The researcher said there was no such thing as a trivial issue.

T / F

e.

Many managers said they thought jargon was annoying.

T / F

f.

Many people wondered why we use jargon instead of simple English.

T / F

g.

"Let's touch base" means to want to feel the bottom of something.

T / F

h.

A campaigner said jargon helps businesses in getting new contracts.

T / F

2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article.

1.

revealed

a.

quoted

2

irritate

b.

unimportant

3.

simply

c.

nearness

4.

proximity

d.

annoy

5.

trivial

e.

keeps apart

6.

emotive

f.

counterparts

7.

cited

g.

shown

8.

equivalents

h.

obstacle

9.

isolates

i.

sensitive

10.

barrier

j.

easily

3. PHRASE MATCH:  (Sometimes more than one choice is possible.)

1.

which habits

a.

equivalents

2

Others high

b.

grow disproportionately

3.

in close

c.

irritation

4.

seemingly trivial issues can

d.

irritate them

5.

begin to cause upset

e.

on the list

6.

a pointless

f.

the box

7.

thinking outside

g.

and resentment

8.

real-world

h.

as a barrier

9.

overused jargon

i.

proximity

10.

It acts

j.

damages the economy

GAP FILL

A survey of over 2,000 British managers has (1) ____________ which habits irritate them most while at work. One of the most  (2) ____________ things for today's managers is the current crop of jargon, or "management speak". Others high on the (3) ____________ include people who sit opposite you sending you emails, when they could (4) ____________ tell you their message; people arriving late for work and for meetings; and people who take (5) ____________ cigarette breaks. Report author Charles Elvin explained why it is important for us to know what annoys people. He said: "When office-based teams work in (6) ____________ proximity for long periods of time, we see that seemingly (7) ____________ issues can grow disproportionately. If left unchecked, they can begin to (8) ____________ upset and resentment."

 

 

trivial
simply
annoying
cause
regular
revealed
list
close

Management jargon (9) ____________ to be an emotive issue for those participating in the research. Many managers described it as a "(10) ____________ irritation" which few people understand. They (11) ____________ why people used it when there are "normal" ways to express the same thing. Cited examples included 'thinking outside the box', 'going forward' and 'let's touch base'. The "real-world (12) ____________ " of these are 'looking at things differently', 'in the future' and 'contact me'. The Plain English Campaign stated (13) ____________ jargon damages the economy. The group said: "Management speak…gets in the (14) ____________ of business….It (15) ____________ newcomers who feel they have to learn the (16) ____________ ….It acts as a barrier to procuring new business."

 

overused
lingo
pointless
way
wondered
proved
isolates
equivalents

LISTENING – Guess the answers. Listen to check

1)

A survey of over 2,000 British managers has revealed which ______ most while at work

 

a.  habits irritated them
b.  habits irritation them
c.  habits irritate them
d.  habit irritates them

2)

the ______ jargon, or "management speak"

 

a.  currant crop of
b.  current crop of
c.  current crap of
d.  current crop off

3)

people arriving late for work and for meetings; and people who ______ breaks

 

a.  take regular cigarettes
b.  taking regular cigarette
c.  take regularity cigarette
d.  take regular cigarette

4)

seemingly trivial issues can ______

 

a.  grow disproportionately
b.  grow disproportion lately
c.  grow this proportion at Lee
d.  grow this proportionately

5)

If left unchecked, they can begin ______ and resentment

 

a.  to cause upset
b.  to course upset
c.  to caused upset
d.  to cause upset

6)

Management jargon proved to be ______

 

a.  the emotive issue
b.  an emotive issue
c.  and a motive issue
d.  an e-motif issue

7)

Many managers described it as a "______" which few people understand

 

a.  pointless irrigation
b.  pointless irrational
c.  point, less irrigation
d.  pointless irritation

8)

Cited examples included 'thinking outside the ______ and 'let's touch base'.

 

a.  box', 'going backward'
b.  box', 'went forward'
c.  box', 'going forward'
d.  box', 'go in forward'

9)

It isolates newcomers who feel they have to ______

 

a.  learn the lingo
b.  learn the lingual
c.  learn a lingo
d.  learn a lingual

10)

It ______ procuring new business

 

a.  acts as a barrier too
b.  acts as a barrier two
c.  acts as a barrier towards
d.  acts as a barrier to

LISTENING – Listen and fill in the gaps

A survey of over 2,000 British managers (1) _______________________ irritate them most while at work. One of the most annoying things for today's managers is (2) _______________________, or "management speak". Others (3) _________________________ who sit opposite you sending you emails, when they could simply tell you their message; people arriving late for work and for meetings; (4) _______________________ cigarette breaks. Report author Charles Elvin explained why it is important for us to know what annoys people. He said: "When office-based teams work (5) _______________________ periods of time, we see that seemingly trivial issues can grow disproportionately. If left unchecked, they can begin to (6) _______________________."

Management jargon proved to be an emotive issue for those participating in the research. Many managers described (7) _______________________ which few people understand. They wondered why people used it when there are "normal" (8) _______________________ same thing. Cited examples included 'thinking outside the box', 'going (9) _______________________ base'. The (10) _______________________ these are 'looking at things differently', 'in the future' and 'contact me'. The Plain English Campaign stated (11) _______________________ the economy. The group said: "Management speak…gets in the way of business….It isolates newcomers who feel they have to learn the lingo….It (12) _______________________ procuring new business."

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS

1.

How many managers took part in the survey?

2.

What thing was mentioned that some people do frequently?

3.

Who do people get annoyed with for sending e-mails?

4.

What did the researcher say can happen to the size of trivial issues?

5.

What can trivial issues lead to?

6.

What was described as a "pointless irritation"?

7.

What did many people wonder about?

8.

What gets damaged by jargon, according to a campaign group?

9.

How does jargon make newer people feel outside of things?

10.

What did a campaigner say jargon was a barrier to?

MULTIPLE CHOICE - QUIZ

1.

How many managers took part in the survey?

6.

What was described as a "pointless irritation"?

 

a) around 2,000
b) 2,000+
c) almost 2,000
d) exactly 2,000

 

a) jargon
b) the survey
c) management
d) overtime

2.

Who do people get annoyed with for sending e-mails?

7.

What did many people wonder about?

 

a) themselves
b) people they don't know
c) jargon-generator websites
d) colleagues they sit opposite to

 

a) happiness at work
b) their managers
c) why people use jargon
d) the meaning of the word "jargon"

3.

What thing was mentioned that some people do frequently?

8.

What gets damaged by jargon, according to a campaign group?

 

a) cigarette breaks
b) taking sick days off
c) go home early
d) pass their work on to others

 

a) the economy
b) the English language
c) the working atmosphere
d) management

4.

What did the researcher say can happen to the size of trivial issues?

9.

How does jargon make newer people feel outside of things?

 

a) it grows a little
b) it shrinks to being invisible
c) it can get much bigger than they
    need to
d) increase twofold

 

a) they feel they have to learn it
b) the jargon is often about them
c) they must pass management tests
d) they feel uneducated

5.

What can trivial issues lead to?

10.

What did a campaigner say jargon was a barrier to?

 

a) fights
b) hurt and bitterness
c) trivial pursuit
d) being fired

 

a) promotion to management
b) the English language
c) intercultural communication
d) getting new business

ROLE PLAY

Role  A – Top manager

You love management jargon. The more, the better. Tell the others three reasons why. You think plain English doesn't motivate workers. Jargon paints an easy-to-understand concept of important ideas. It also makes people feel modern and fills them with dynamism. English always changes.

Role  B – Old manager

You hate management jargon. Tell the others three reasons why. You have used normal, plain English for decades and no one has misunderstood you. Jargon is confusing and leads to mistakes and wastes time. It's only used by people wanting to look cool, but they aren't cool.

Role  C – Assistant manager

You are totally confused by e-mails and presentations from your boss. It is full of jargon you don't understand. You want a jargon-free workplace. Tell the others three reasons why. You don't understand why people can't use plain English. You have wasted time asking what the jargon means.

Role  D – Management expert

You think jargon is an important and necessary part of business. Tell the others three reasons why. Business is so dynamic and changing that it needs new language. When people think about the meaning of jargon, they understand the concept better and so perform better.

AFTER READING / LISTENING

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionary / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words 'pet' and 'hate'.

pet

hate

 

 

 

  • Share your findings with your partners.
  • Make questions using the words you found.
  • Ask your partner / group your questions.

2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

  • Share your questions with other classmates / groups.
  • Ask your partner / group your questions.

3. GAP FILL: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers. Talk about the words from the activity. Were they new, interesting, worth learning…?

4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

5. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall how they were used in the text:

  • revealed
  • crop
  • list
  • regular
  • close
  • upset
  • participating
  • normal
  • box
  • contact
  • way
  • barrier

JARGON SURVEY

Write five GOOD questions about jargon in the table. Do this in pairs. Each student must write the questions on his / her own paper.

When you have finished, interview other students. Write down their answers.

 

STUDENT 1

_____________

STUDENT 2

_____________

STUDENT 3

_____________

Q.1.

 

 

 

 

Q.2.

 

 

 

 

Q.3.

 

 

 

 

Q.4.

 

 

 

 

Q.5.

 

 

 

 

  • Now return to your original partner and share and talk about what you found out. Change partners often.
  • Make mini-presentations to other groups on your findings.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION

STUDENT A's QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

a)

What did you think when you read the headline?

b)

What springs to mind when you hear the word 'jargon'?

c)

What's the difference between English jargon and "plain" English?

d)

How and why does jargon start?

e)

Is jargon good or bad for business?

f)

What jargon in your language do you like or dislike?

g)

What are your most hated words in English (and in your language)?

h)

What do you think of people arriving late to work?

i)

Do other workers / students in your office / class annoy you?

j)

What trivial issues have you seen grow disproportionately?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

STUDENT B's QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

a)

Did you like reading this article? Why/not?

b)

Do you understand why people get upset or angry with jargon?

c)

What irritates you most in your daily life?

d)

What do you think of the jargon, "think outside the box"?

e)

Is it better to use plain English and not jargon?

f)

How do you think jargon can damage an economy?

g)

Do you think you are a good team member?

h)

What do you do that might annoy other people?

i)

What was the last win-win situation you experienced?

j)

What questions would you like to ask a management expert?

DISCUSSION (Write your own questions)

STUDENT A's QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

1.

________________________________________________________

2.

________________________________________________________

3.

________________________________________________________

4.

________________________________________________________

5.

________________________________________________________

6.

________________________________________________________

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

STUDENT B's QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

1.

________________________________________________________

2.

________________________________________________________

3.

________________________________________________________

4.

________________________________________________________

5.

________________________________________________________

6.

________________________________________________________

MULTIPLE CHOICE - LANGUAGE

A survey of over 2,000 British managers has (1) ____ which habits irritate them most while at work. One of the most annoying things for today's managers is the current (2) ____ of jargon, or "management speak". Others (3) ____ on the list include people who sit opposite you sending you emails, when they could (4) ____ tell you their message; people arriving late for work and for meetings; and people who take regular cigarette breaks. Report author Charles Elvin explained why it is important for us to know what annoys people. He said: "When office-(5) ____  teams work in close proximity for long periods of time, we see that seemingly trivial issues can grow disproportionately. If left (6) ____, they can begin to cause upset and resentment."

Management jargon (7) ____ to be an emotive issue for those participating in the research. Many managers described it as a "(8) ____  irritation" which few people understand. They wondered why people used it when there are "normal" ways to (9) ____ the same thing. Cited examples included 'thinking outside the box', 'going forward' and 'let's touch base'. The "real-world (10) ____ " of these are 'looking at things differently', 'in the future' and 'contact me'. The Plain English Campaign stated overused jargon damages the economy. The group said: "Management speak…gets (11) ____ the way of business….It isolates newcomers who feel they have to learn the lingo….It (12) ____ as a barrier to procuring new business."

Put the correct words from the table below in the above article.

1.

(a)

reveled

(b)

rivaled

(c)

revealed

(d)

unraveled

2.

(a)

crop

(b)

crib

(c)

crap

(d)

crab

3.

(a)

high

(b)

tall

(c)

deep

(d)

wide

4.

(a)

simply

(b)

dimple

(c)

pimply

(d)

limply

5.

(a)

cased

(b)

based

(c)

phased

(d)

phrased

6.

(a)

unintended

(b)

unloved

(c)

unticked

(d)

unchecked

7.

(a)

evidenced

(b)

doubted

(c)

proved

(d)

verified

8.

(a)

pointing

(b)

pointer

(c)

pointed

(d)

pointless

9.

(a)

express

(b)

service

(c)

check out

(d)

reserve

10.

(a)

equivalence

(b)

equivalents

(c)

equivalently

(d)

equivalent

11.

(a)

on

(b)

in

(c)

up

(d)

to

12.

(a)

performs

(b)

plays

(c)

acts

(d)

stars

SPELLING

Paragraph 1

1.

which habits ratterii them most

2.

people who sit ipesoopt you

3.

cgairttee breaks

4.

work in close tixpiyrom

5.

seemingly aitilvr issues

6.

cause upset and mtetenensr

Paragraph 2

7.

proved to be an emeovit issue

8.

dteic examples

9.

real-world snlietuaqve

10.

edesruvo jargon

11.

it sltsoeai newcomers

12.

a barrier to gpnirrcuo new business

PUT THE TEXT BACK TOGETHER

Number these lines in the correct order.

(    )

issues can grow disproportionately. If left unchecked, they can begin to cause upset and resentment."

(    )

Management jargon proved to be an emotive issue for those participating in the

(    )

author Charles Elvin explained why it is important for us to know what annoys people. He said: "When office-

(    )

things differently', 'in the future' and 'contact me'. The Plain English Campaign stated overused

(    )

newcomers who feel they have to learn the lingo….It acts as a barrier to procuring new business."

1  )

A survey of over 2,000 British managers has revealed which habits irritate them most

(    )

based teams work in close proximity for long periods of time, we see that seemingly trivial

(    )

the box', 'going forward' and 'let's touch base'. The "real-world equivalents" of these are 'looking at

(    )

while at work. One of the most annoying things for today's managers is the current crop of jargon, or "management speak". Others high

(    )

when there are "normal" ways to express the same thing. Cited examples included 'thinking outside

(    )

message; people arriving late for work and for meetings; and people who take regular cigarette breaks. Report

(    )

jargon damages the economy. The group said: "Management speak…gets in the way of business….It isolates

(    )

on the list include people who sit opposite you sending you emails, when they could simply tell you their

(    )

research. Many managers described it as a "pointless irritation" which few people understand. They wondered why people used it

PUT THE WORDS IN THE RIGHT ORDER

1.

which    them   at   Revealed   irritate   while   habits    most    work.

2.

sending     who     you     sit     emails     opposite     you     People.    

3.

periods   of   time   Teams   work   in   close   proximity    for    long.

4.

issues     grow     trivial     can     disproportionately     Seemingly.    

5.

and     begin     resentment     to     cause     They     upset     can.    

6.

irritation     it     as    Many    a    managers    pointless     described.

7.

the     normal     express    thing    are    to    same    There     ways.    

8.

of     equivalents     world     -     real     The     these.    

9.

feel     to     lingo     who    have    the    Newcomers    they     learn.    

10.

as     to     business     acts     barrier     new     It     a     procuring.    

CIRCLE THE CORRECT WORD (20 PAIRS)

A survey of over 2,000 British managers has unraveled / revealed which habits irritate them most while at work. One of the most annoying things for today's managers is the current crap / crop of jargon, or "management speak". Others high / tall on the list include people who sit opposite / opposites you sending you emails, when they could simple / simply tell you their message; people arrival / arriving late for work and for meetings; and people who take regular cigarette rests / breaks. Report author Charles Elvin explained why it is important for us to know what annoyances / annoys people. He said: "When office-based teams work in close proximity for long periods of time, we see that seems / seemingly trivial issues can grow disproportionately. If left unchecked / unticked, they can begin to cause upset and resentment."

Management jargon proved to be an emotion / emotive issue for those participating on / in the research. Many managers described it as a "pointless irritation / irritating" which few people understand. They wandered / wondered why people used it when there are "normal" ways to express / expression the same thing. Cited examples included 'thinking outside the box', 'going forward' and 'let's touch basic / base'. The "real-world equivalents / equivalence" of these are 'looking at things differently', 'in the future' and 'contact me'. The Plain English Campaign stated underused / overused jargon damages the economy. The group said: "Management speak…gets in the way / path of business….It isolates newcomers who feel they have to learn the lingo….It acts as / has a barrier to procuring new business."

Talk about the connection between each pair of words in italics, and why the correct word is correct.

INSERT THE VOWELS (a, e, i, o, u)

_ s_rv_y _f _v_r 2,000 Br_t_sh m_n_g_rs h_s r_v__l_d wh_ch h_b_ts _rr_t_t_ th_m m_st wh_l_ _t w_rk. _n_ _f th_ m_st _nn_y_ng th_ngs f_r t_d_y's m_n_g_rs _s th_ c_rr_nt cr_p _f j_rg_n, _r "m_n_g_m_nt sp__k". _th_rs h_gh _n th_ l_st _ncl_d_ p__pl_ wh_ s_t _pp_s_t_ y__ s_nd_ng y__ _m__ls, wh_n th_y c__ld s_mply t_ll y__ th__r m_ss_g_; p__pl_ _rr_v_ng l_t_ f_r w_rk _nd f_r m__t_ngs; _nd p__pl_ wh_ t_k_ r_g_l_r c_g_r_tt_ br__ks. R_p_rt __th_r Ch_rl_s _lv_n _xpl__n_d why _t _s _mp_rt_nt f_r _s t_ kn_w wh_t _nn_ys p__pl_. H_ s__d: "Wh_n _ff_c_-b_s_d t__ms w_rk _n cl_s_ pr_x_m_ty f_r l_ng p_r__ds _f t_m_, w_ s__ th_t s__m_ngly tr_v__l _ss__s c_n gr_w d_spr_p_rt__n_t_ly. _f l_ft _nch_ck_d, th_y c_n b_g_n t_ c__s_ _ps_t _nd r_s_ntm_nt."

M_n_g_m_nt j_rg_n pr_v_d t_ b_ _n _m_t_v_ _ss__ f_r th_s_ p_rt_c_p_t_ng _n th_ r_s__rch. M_ny m_n_g_rs d_scr_b_d _t _s _ "p__ntl_ss _rr_t_t__n" wh_ch f_w p__pl_ _nd_rst_nd. Th_y w_nd_r_d why p__pl_ _s_d _t wh_n th_r_ _r_ "n_rm_l" w_ys t_ _xpr_ss th_ s_m_ th_ng. C_t_d _x_mpl_s _ncl_d_d 'th_nk_ng __ts_d_ th_ b_x', 'g__ng f_rw_rd' _nd 'l_t's t__ch b_s_'. Th_ "r__l-w_rld _q__v_l_nts" _f th_s_ _r_ 'l__k_ng _t th_ngs d_ff_r_ntly', '_n th_ f_t_r_' _nd 'c_nt_ct m_'. Th_ Pl__n _ngl_sh C_mp__gn st_t_d _v_r_s_d j_rg_n d_m_g_s th_ _c_n_my. Th_ gr__p s__d: "M_n_g_m_nt sp__k…g_ts _n th_ w_y _f b_s_n_ss…._t _s_l_t_s n_wc_m_rs wh_ f__l th_y h_v_ t_ l__rn th_ l_ng_…._t _cts _s _ b_rr__r t_ pr_c_r_ng n_w b_s_n_ss."

PUNCTUATE THE TEXT AND ADD CAPITALS

a survey of over 2000 british managers has revealed which habits irritate them most while at work one of the most annoying things for today's managers is the current crop of jargon or "management speak" others high on the list include people who sit opposite you sending you emails when they could simply tell you their message people arriving late for work and for meetings and people who take regular cigarette breaks report author charles elvin explained why it is important for us to know what annoys people he said "when office-based teams work in close proximity for long periods of time we see that seemingly trivial issues can grow disproportionately if left unchecked they can begin to cause upset and resentment"

management jargon proved to be an emotive issue for those participating in the research many managers described it as a "pointless irritation" which few people understand they wondered why people used it when there are "normal" ways to express the same thing cited examples included 'thinking outside the box' 'going forward' and 'let's touch base' the "real-world equivalents" of these are 'looking at things differently' 'in the future' and 'contact me' the plain english campaign stated overused jargon damages the economy the group said "management speak…gets in the way of business…it isolates newcomers who feel they have to learn the lingo…it acts as a barrier to procuring new business"

PUT A SLASH ( / ) WHERE THE SPACES ARE

Putthepunctuationmarksbackintothefollowingtext:

Asurveyofover2,000Britishmanagershasrevealedwhichhabitsirritatethemmost
whileatwork.Oneofthemostannoyingthingsfortoday'smanagersisthecurrentcrop
ofjargon,or"managementspeak".Othershighonthelistincludepeoplewhosit
oppositeyousendingyouemails,whentheycouldsimplytellyoutheirmessage;
peoplearrivinglateforworkandformeetings;andpeoplewhotakeregularcigarette
breaks.ReportauthorCharlesElvinexplainedwhyitisimportantforustoknowwhat
annoyspeople.Hesaid:"Whenoffice-basedteamsworkincloseproximityforlong
periodsoftime,weseethatseeminglytrivialissuescangrowdisproportionately.If
leftunchecked,theycanbegintocauseupsetandresentment."Managementjargon
provedtobeanemotiveissueforthoseparticipatingintheresearch.Manymanagers
describeditasa"pointlessirritation"whichfewpeopleunderstand.Theywondered
whypeopleuseditwhenthereare"normal"waystoexpressthesamething.Cited
examplesincluded'thinkingoutsidethebox','goingforward'and'let'stouch
base'.The"real-worldequivalents"oftheseare'lookingatthingsdifferently',
'inthefuture'and'contactme'.ThePlainEnglishCampaignstatedoverusedjargon
damagestheeconomy.Thegroupsaid:"Managementspeak…getsinthewayof
business….Itisolatesnewcomerswhofeeltheyhavetolearnthelingo….Itactsas
abarriertoprocuringnewbusiness."

FREE WRITING

Write about jargon for 10 minutes. Comment on your partner's paper.

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ACADEMIC WRITING

Too much jargon entering the world of business is confusing and leads to poor communication. It should be banned.   Discuss.

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HOMEWORK

1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google's search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.

2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find out more about business jargon. Share what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.

3. JARGON: Make a poster about jargon. Show your work to your classmates in the next lesson. Did you all have similar things?

4. MANAGEMENT SPEAK: Write a magazine article about management speak. Include imaginary interviews with people who are for and against it.

Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Write down any new words and expressions you hear from your partner(s).

5. WHAT HAPPENED NEXT? Write a newspaper article about the next stage in this news story. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Give each other feedback on your articles.

6. LETTER: Write a letter to business expert. Ask him/her three questions about jargon. Give him/her three of your opinions on it. Read your letter to your partner(s) in your next lesson. Your partner(s) will answer your questions.

ANSWERS

TRUE / FALSE (p.4)

a

F

b

T

c

T

d

F

e

T

f

T

g

F

h

F

SYNONYM MATCH (p.4)

1.

revealed

a.

shown

2

irritate

b.

annoy

3.

simply

c.

easily

4.

proximity

d.

nearness

5.

trivial

e.

unimportant

6.

emotive

f.

sensitive

7.

cited

g.

quoted

8.

equivalents

h.

counterparts

9.

isolates

i.

keeps apart

10.

barrier

j.

obstacle

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS (p.8)

1.

Over 2,000

2.

People who sit opposite each other

3.

Take regular cigarette breaks

4.

They can grow disproportionately

5.

Upset and resentment

6.

Management jargon

7.

Why people used jargon in place of simple English

8.

The economy

9.

They feel they have to learn the lingo

10.

Getting new business

MULTIPLE CHOICE - QUIZ (p.9)

1.

b

2.

d

3.

a

4.

c

5.

b

6.

a

7.

c

8.

a

9.

a

10.

d

ALL OTHER EXERCISES

Please check for yourself by looking at the Article on page 2.
(It's good for your English ;-)

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